Book Review: Red Team by Micah Zenko

Red Team: How to Succeed By Thinking Like the Enemy by Micah Zenko focuses on the role that red teaming plays in a variety of institutions, ranging from the Department of Defense to cybersecurity. It’s an excellent book that describes the thought process behind red teaming, when red teaming is a success and when it can be a failure, and the way a red team can best fit into an organization and provide value. If you’re looking for a book that’s highly technical or focused entirely on information security engineering, this book may disappoint. There’s only a single chapter covering the application of red teaming in the information security space (particularly “vulnerability probes” as Zenko refers to many of the tests), but that doesn’t make the rest of the content any less useful – or interesting – to the Red Team practitioner.


Security Is Not an Absolute

If there’s one thing I wish people from outside the security industry knew when dealing with information security, it’s that Security is not an absolute. Most of the time, it’s not even quantifiable. Even in the case of particular threat models, it’s often impossible to make statements about the security of a system with certainty.


Playing with the Gigastone Media Streamer Plus

A few months ago, I was shopping on woot.com and discovered the Gigastone Media Streamer Plus for about $25. I figured this might be something occassionally useful, or at least fun to look at for security vulnerabilities. When it arrived, I didn't get around to it for quite a while, and then when I finally did, I was terribly disappointed in it as a security research target -- it was just too easy.

Psychological Issues in the Security Industry

I've unfortunately had the experience of dealing with a number of psychological issues (either personally or through personal connections) during my tenure in the security fold. I hope to shed some light on them and encourage others to take them seriously.

socat as a handler for multiple reverse shells

I needed a way to handle multiple reverse shells calling back to the same C2 host. It's a little convoluted, but I found a way to receive multiple incoming sessions and multiplex them into tmux windows.